Agriculture

agriculture

With more than 60% of its 1.166 billion people living in rural areas, Africa’s economy is inherently dependent on agriculture. More than 32% of the continent’s gross domestic product comes from the sector.

Africa spends US$35.4bn on food imports annually, despite being home to 65% of the world’s undeveloped arable land. Unless something drastic is done, demographic factors such as population and urbanisation, which bring about increased demand for food and changing consumption patterns, are expected to raise Africa’s net food import to over $110bn by 2025.

field

One of the reasons why agriculture in Africa has been lagging behind the rest of the world is because small-scale farmers are often reluctant to adopt better but unfamiliar practices. How can this cycle be broken? This article looks at two contrasting responses, one in Ghana and one in Benin, to adaptation and the impact they have produced. 

With more than 60% of its 1.166 billion people[1],[2] living in rural areas, Africa’s economy is inherently dependent on agriculture. More than 32% of the continent’s gross domestic product comes from the sector. However, agricultural productivity still remains far from developed world standards. Over 90% of agriculture depends on rainfall, with no artificial irrigation aid. The techniques used to cultivate the soil are still far behind from what has been adopted in Asia and Americas, lacking not only irrigation, but also fertilizers, pesticides and access to high yield seeds. Agriculture in Africa also experiences basic infrastructural problems such as access to markets and financing.

agriculture

Singapore has many things to offer to Africa, but no one would have imagined one of these things may be organic fertiliser with the understanding that agriculture is not what Singapore is best known for. Nevertheless, a firm with an unorthodox business positioning, Biomax Technologies has developed an innovative solution in producing top grade organic fertilizer that is rich in organic matter and free from pathogens and odour.

 

 

 

NTU-SBF Centre for African Studies

 

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